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BRAINTRUST IS PROUD TO PRESENT “TRAINING FROM THE BACK OF THE ROOM!” BY  SHARON BOWMAN

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Sharon Bowman

If you have attended one of our Braintrust training classes, then you know we do things a little differently. We build paper airplanes, we design board games, and we even make fruit salads in classes. We do these fun, interactive learning activities because we use  Sharon Bowman’s techniques for teaching from the back of the room.

After receiving requests from other trainers as well as class attendees, we are proud to announce that Braintrust Consulting Group is bringing Sharon and her training techniques to Nashville for two special classes. These classes are limited in size, and we expect the demand to be high, so make your reservations early!

 

Two Day Train the Trainer Program:

TRAINING FROM THE BACK OF THE ROOM!

Jan 12-13, 2015 – Nashville
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/training-from-the-back-of-the-room-tickets-12411833127

Take your training skills to a more advanced level as you discover how the human brain really learns which is very different from traditional assumptions about learning. Explore the most current “cognitive neuroscience” about effective instruction – how the brain takes in, stores, retrieves and uses knowledge. Discover six powerful learning principles based on the best of brain science, then apply these principles every time you train, teach, or coach others.

This training is relevant to anyone who trains, teaches, or facilitates learning, whether in corporate, business, or educational settings. The training strategies you will learn can also be applied to computer-based instruction, as well as classroom learning environments. If you are an Agile coach or Scrum trainer, you will be especially pleased to discover how to combine Agile/Scrum concepts with collaborative learner-engagement.

Click here for full class details.

 

One Day Trainer Certification Class:

HOW TO PRESENT “TRAINING FROM THE BACK OF THE ROOM!”

Jan 14, 2015 – Nashville
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/trainer-certification-class-how-to-present-training-from-the-back-of-the-room-tickets-12412190195

This 1-day trainer certification course is designed to give you the professional training skills you need to present Sharon Bowman’s 2-day train-the-trainer program “Training from the BACK of the Room.” Along with individualized instruction, guided practice, instructor and peer coaching and feedback, you will receive a complete facilitator’s guide and slide set for the 2-day train-the-trainer workshop. Plus, you’ll receive a year of free coaching from Sharon to help polish your “Training from the BACK of the Room” presentation skills.

This exciting 1-day certification course is being offered for the second time in the United States and registration is limited to 20 participants. Upon the successful completion of this course, you will be licensed to deliver “Training from the BACK of the Room” to your own clients, customers, company, and country.

You will join an exceptional group of global trainers when you become a Certified Trainer for “Training from the BACK of the Room!”

Click here for full class details.

These classes are limited in size, and we expect the demand to be high, so make your reservations early!

Roles in Scrum – Attitudes & Traits

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Most people who have heard of Scrum will know the roles involved, at a minimum.  However, they may not know the attitudes and traits that are important for the roles.  This

The Scrum Team
It’s a team effort

article is an excerpt from the book, “Scrum for the Rest of Us,” by Brian Rabon that will define some of the attitudes and traits that great Scrum practitioners have.

ScrumMaster

If one sentence were used to sum up the duties of the ScrumMaster, it is that they facilitate the Scrum process as a Servant Leader (someone who leads by first taking care of others’ needs).  A ScrumMaster works hand-in-hand with the Product Owner to act as an Information Radiator to the Stakeholders and clears Roadblocks out of the Team’s way.

Key Attitude

“I don’t succeed unless the Team succeeds. My mission in life is to grease the wheels and ensure that everyone is playing nice and that the process is running smoothly.” – ScrumMaster

Traits of an Effective ScrumMaster
  • Humble with no need to take credit for the Team’s work. They get all their satisfaction from seeing the team succeed
  • Servant Leader who puts the needs of the Team ahead of his/her own, and is willing to do what it takes to help the team succeed
  • Diligently pursues any obstacle blocking the Team’s progress and will not stop until the obstacle is removed
  • Advocates for the Team, Product Owner, and the Scrum process throughout the organization
  • Loyal to the Team, the Product, and the Organization

Product Owner

The Product Owner has strategic oversight of the Return on Investment (ROI) for the Product.  They are involved in Product Planning through Visioning, Road-Mapping, and Release Planning.  In general, the Product Owner works with Stakeholders and project sponsors to perform strategic planning.

The Product Owner is also responsible for the Product Backlog.  They own it, maintain it, and prioritize it (Note: Some say that the Product Backlog is Ordered, not Prioritized). They always assure that the needs of the Stakeholders are being best presented to the Team for implementation within the Sprints.

Key Attitude

“I own this Product and I want to see it succeed.  I will only ask the Team to build what has Business Value and an ROI for my organization.  I am a consensus builder, and I love marketing and selling the value of what the Team has accomplished.” – Product Owner

Traits of an Effective Product Owner
  • Loves to communicate, communicate, communicate
  • Able to see the big picture
  • Adept and nimble at navigating the political waters
  • Holds admiration and respect from the key Stakeholders (Don’t worry: this takes time to develop)
  • Has a passion for the Product and markets and sells it to everyone
  • Willing to make decisions at the last responsible moment
  • Likes to spend time with the Team and answer their questions
  • Not afraid to get into the weeds from time-to-time

Team Member

Think of the Team Member as someone who does the work of developing the Product. A Team is ideally comprised of 5 to 9 members (7 +/- 2).  The three primary characteristics of the Team are that they are Cross-Functional – diverse skill sets on the Team, Self-Orgaznizing – everyone decides what type of work they would like to do, and Self-Managing – they decide their own tasks and the order in which to accomplish them.

Key Attitude

“I do my work, and I do it well, but my race isn’t won until all my fellow Team Members cross the finish line with me.  We win as a Team. I check my title (as well as my ego) at the door; I am willing to do whatever it takes to help the Team succeed, even if that means working outside my area of expertise or comfort zone.” – Team Member

Traits of an Effective Team Member
  • “T-Shaped” person: someone who has deep knowledge in one or two areas, but is also skilled across multiple domains (a Specializing Generalist)
  • Craftsperson who is a career professional and takes pride in doing quality work
  • Team player who enjoys the camaraderie of working with others on challenging problems
  • An open individual who is willing to share the honest truth (the good, bad, and the ugly) of how they are doing at all times
  • Someone who isn’t afraid to ask for help when they need it.

We realize that it is often difficult to find all of the traits in a single person.  These traits can be learned and should be considered a “model” for excellence.  Are there other traits that you specifically look for in the roles in your Scrum teams?  We would love to hear about them.

Braintrust’s own Kate Megaw just became a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST)!

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Kate Megaw
Kate Megaw, CST, PMP

 

Braintrust Consulting Group is proud to announce that Kate Megaw, our COO, has been officially awarded the Certified Scrum Trainer® designation by the Scrum Alliance.

Earning this certification now means that Kate can now help others transform their complex projects with greater innovation and efficiency through the use of Scrum. Because Kate also holds the CSM and CSPO certifications through the Scrum Alliance, she can now teach Certified ScrumMaster and Certified Scrum Product Owner classes.

For those of you who don’t know a lot about the CST® designation, it is an extremely rigorous process that takes several years to complete. Kate has been working toward this goal since 2012.

In order to be considered for CST® certification, an individual must:

  • Demonstrate a deep knowledge and understanding of Scrum concepts, practices, and principles.
  • Hold an active Certified Scrum Professional designation from Scrum Alliance.
  • Have extensive experience implementing Scrum inside organizations as a member of the team, as the Product Owner or ScrumMaster, or as a mentor.
  • Have taught Scrum (to a minimum of 100 students) in a noncertified context or in partnership with a current CST.

The application process alone requires five letters of recommendations from existing CSTs, based on co-training with them.

We took a few minutes to ask Kate about the process and here’s what she had to say:

Q: What made you decide to pursue your CST® certification?

Kate: Over the last five years, I have worked with companies all over the United States as a Scrum Coach and taught non-certified classes such as Scrum Essentials, Kanban Essentials, and User Story Workshop. I’ve seen the benefits of the Agile/Scrum framework first hand. I believe in the methodology. I believe it is the most effective way to get work done. So for me, becoming a CST® was the next logical step.

Q: How hard was the process?

Kate: Overall the process was definitely rigorous. But I can confidently say the Scrum Alliance has built a great program for earning the CST® certification. It takes a ton of work, but there is a reason for everything that they require. The challenging process is the best way to ensure that only the highest quality, most dedicated professionals carry the CST® certification.

Q: What was the most rewarding part of the process?

Kate: One of the requirements for earning the CST® is co-training with people who have already earned their certification. For me, this was absolutely priceless. It was great to see how other people teach CSM and CSPO classes, because we each do it a little differently. So, co-training is an opportunity to learn from others and kind of pick the best parts from each person’s training approach. I think I probably took more notes than some of the class attendees. It was fascinating to see how other trainers structure their classes and will definitely have an impact on how I train as I incorporate some of their methods into my classes.

Q: So, now that you have earned your CST®, what’s next?

Kate: In addition to my Agile coaching, I will now be teaching some of the certified Braintrust training classes such as CSM and CSPO. As with everything in Scrum, my goal is to continually improve. The learning is never complete. My goal is to continue to be actively involved in the Scrum community, continue learning from other CST’s and to build the best possible training classes for our clients.

Kate Megaw Interviewed at Agile Open SoCal 2014

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Braintrust coach and trainer Kate Megaw was interviewed at the 2014 Southern California Agile Open conference.  You can view the entire interview on YouTube.Agile Open California

In the interview Kate shares her experiences with Agile as a coach and trainer.  She covers topics such as:

  • Her journey to becoming a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST)
  • The transition from a traditional Project Manager (PMP) to the world of Agile and specifically Scrum
  • The role of coaches in support of Scrum in large companies and the value of becoming a Certified Scrum Coach (CSC)
  • The current gaps in training and trouble spots in Scrum implementations
  • The power of being involved in the Agile community
Kate Megaw
Kate Megaw, CST, PMP

Key takeaways that you can get from the interview:

  1. The experience of co-training with a variety of CSTs is invaluable.  Kate believes that CSTs should continue to co-train even after becoming certified to enhance the inspect and adapt aspect of their training.
  2. Traditionally PMPs have been seen as moving into the role of ScrumMaster, lately she has seen more move into the role of Product Owner.
  3. One of the biggest challenges for traditional project managers in moving to Scrum is giving up command and control and becoming a Servant Leader.
  4. Scrum coaches should not be seen as a “permanent employee” of the organization.  Instead, they should be there to “teach the teams to fish” so that they can do it well by themselves.
  5. We’ve done a good job of training ScrumMasters but we need to do a better job of training Product Owners and Developers.  Training for all team members is important for success.
  6. More awareness needs to be created around the Certified Scrum Professional (CSP) certification.  ScrumMasters and Product Owners need to see this as a career path and organizations need to be educated with respect to the value of moving their people forward.
  7. Being actively involved in the broader Agile community is highly beneficial to all who are involved.  Sharing of experiences, asking questions, inspecting and adapting the process is important for growth of the individual, the organization, and adoption of Agile in general.
  8. Metrics in Agile are important, we have to educate the PMO & Stakeholders in the metrics we use, and adapt them, to give them what they need to do their job.  We’re all in this together and success is the ultimate goal.

We hope you enjoy this interview and the sharing of experiences.  At the Braintrust Consulting Group we are passionate about Agile and are here to assist you in your journey.

Braintrust President Brian Rabon to Keynote 2014 Tampa Bay Annual Symposium

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Friday, September 12, 2014 Braintrust President, Brian M. Rabon, CST PMP will offer up a keynote address entitled “Living An Agile Life! – How To Use The Values And Principles Of Agile To live A Passionate, Purpose-Filled Life” at the 2014 Tampa Bay Annual Symposium. This energetic, edge-of-your-seat keynote is scheduled to begin at 8:00 AM EST. In order to register for this excellent 2-day event at the Sheraton Tampa East go to – https://pmi-tampabay.org/index.php/events/eventlisting?eventId=450&controller=event&task=individualRegister.

Live Agile!
Live Agile!

KEYNOTE ABSTRACT: Do you find it can be a struggle waking up every day with energy and passion for what is to come? Do you find balancing your work, personal, and family “to-do list” to be a challenge? Do you yearn for work projects that consistently succeed and leave everyone feeling great? Agile is founded upon a set of 4 values and 12 principles. These values and principles, when applied to how we live our lives, can help us accomplish amazing things. We can; find our passion, take control of our to-do list, and succeed with products/projects at work. This keynote address will explain how you can employ some simple techniques in order to live your own Agile life.

BIO: Brian M. Rabon, CST, PMP is the President of The Braintrust Consulting Group, a worldwide leader in Agile transformations. Throughout his 17 years of IT industry experience, Brian has applied Agile methods in order to successfully deliver working product to his customers. Brian holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science from Auburn University and a Master’s Degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. When not in the classroom, Brian can be found around the globe evangelizing the benefits of Agile to the likes of Agile 20XX, the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) many chapters, and the Scrum Alliance’s Scrum Gatherings. Brian is the author of Scrum For The Rest Of Us and an avid blogger, writing for his company’s blog at http://www.braintrustgroup.com/blog.

We Support Bringing Agility to Hope High School

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A message from John Miller, a close friend of The Braintrust Consulting Group

I have been volunteering for Hope High School, a charter school in Arizona, part of the Blueprint Education charter school system. They help “at-risk” students where regular public school has not been able to meet their needs. This school is often their last chance to get a high school diploma. Hope High Hope High School FrontSchool knows that they need a better model to help these kids, and see Agile as the way to do it. Out of all the schools and classrooms I have helped over the past few years, this school has the greatest potential to make this happen, from leadership to every classroom.

They have a Dream Team of Agile Educators. Since I started volunteering to help Blueprint bring Agile into their headquarters, their CEO (Mark French), COO (Marmy Kondras), and a high school teacher (Jeff Horton) have all become Certified ScrumMasters. The Principal of Hope High School, Krissyn Sumare, used Agile at a technical college in their game development program, and is a big believer.

After a half day Agility workshop this summer, the entire staff of Hope High School has bought in. If successful there, Blueprint Education plans on bringing Agile to all their other schools. This could be the tipping point to start spreading Agility in more and more schools. As these kids talk to their parents and they themselves enter the workforce with an Agile mindset, Agile is bound to spread exponentially, and that is also good for business.

Yet, even with their enthusiasm, it might not happen. They need lots of support and coaching. My experience has proved that if teachers do not have in-person coaching and support, their experiment with Agile in the classroom dies a quick death. So we are raising funds through Indiegogo to support continuous coaching and resources for the teachers and students.

I am reaching out to you to donate to this great cause.  Your donation will make an immediate impact on student lives and will give momentum to the fundraising effort. The more you donate, the more time and resources we can put  toward making this successful. You will leave a legacy, and maybe start a real movement in K-12 education.

John MillerWith Deep Gratitude,

John Miller

CPCC, ACC, CSP, PMP, HDI SCD, ITIL

Vibrant Lives, Work, Communities, & Schools

http://theagileschool.blogspot.com/

http://www.rightshiftlearning.com

 

The Braintrust Consulting Group is supporting this effort and has made a substantial donation. Won’t you join us?

Guest Post – Jessica Kennedy – Personal Agility

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Living Agile – What is living agile?

By: Jessica Kennedy

Are your ready to embrace change? Put your obligations into perspective? Do what you want to do?!?

Living agile is being adaptable. Bringing into your life new experiences, new opportunities.

Living Agile is maximizing all your resources; your time, your money, and what you want to experience. Apply this to what you want to do, need to do and have to do.

Items that you may see on my list would be:

  • Workout (boot camp) 2X per week
  • Meditate 10 min per day
  • Make the new recipe X
  • Do a particular activity with my daughter
  • Grocery shop
  • Shop Farmer’s Mkt

This list is a combination of what I have to do, what I need to do and what I want to do.

Week Long To Do List

With this visual representation, I can see how to balance my week of activities. Taking care of myself is my top priority so I list it first, then spending time with my daughter, then trying a new recipe. You will notice shopping for food is the bottom of my list. My least favorite is a “have” to do so I will need to make a time allowance for that activity.

How do you create one of these charts? You can use a nice sized piece of poster board to lay out the columns and headers. Then use post-it notes to populate your “to do” list so that they can move across the board, successfully to the DONE column.

This type of board can be done for the week as above or for a day as below:

Daily To Do List

Daily To Do List - Kanban Board
Daily To Do List – Kanban Board

With this tool, in the layout that works best for you, visibility can be gained from all the activities you are committing to for a given time period. If you are over committed, you can gain control over your life by identifying what has to be done and pull into your schedule what you need to do for yourself.

This is a key in getting out of an autopilot mode of your daily routine.

So many people say, “I want better health!” So what are you going to do differently!!!!

Jessica Kennedy
Jessica Kennedy

- Jessica is an Wellness Coach & IT Professional in Nashville, TN. She is a Certified ScrumMaster and Certified Scrum Product Owner. As a long term friend of Braintrust we are proud to feature her article here on our Blog!